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[VTS SF Logo, 3 kb]

User's Manual, Online Edition

January, 1999

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Table of Contents:

Introduction

San Francisco Vessel Traffic Service Operations

Inshore Sector Procedures

Offshore Sector Procedures

Captain of the Port Advisories

Federal Regulations

INTRODUCTION

The Online Edition of the VTS San Francisco User's Manual is provided on the U. S. Coast Guard's World Wide Web server so that users may access the document easily. The content is exactly the same as the printed edition of the same date. Only the layout is different.

This edition of the San Francisco Vessel Traffic Service (VTS) User's Manual reflects significant changes in VTS operations and in other navigational procedures for the San Francisco VTS area. Primary among these changes is the fact that Congress has made participation in all Vessel Traffic Services (VTSs) mandatory as of 13 October 1994. Further, effective 3 May 1995 the Coast Guard has established Regulated Navigation Areas (RNAs) in the San Francisco VTS area so as to reduce vessel congestion where maneuvering room is limited.

But the primary mission of San Francisco Vessel Traffic Service remains the same: to coordinate the safe and efficient transit of vessels in San Francisco Bay in an effort to prevent accidents and the associated loss of life and damage to property and the environment.

[VTS radar tower, 8 kb]To carry out this mission and the secondary mission of assisting Coast Guard units and other public agencies, VTS uses radar, closed-circuit television (CCTV), and VHF-FM radiotelephone to gather and disseminate vessel traffic information. The VTS personnel who staff the Vessel Traffic Center 24 hours a day, seven days a week receive reports from mariners and correlate those reports with radar and CCTV pictures to get an accurate picture of vessel movements. Thus the accuracy of information that VTS provides depends largely on mariners' participation-VTS traffic summaries can be no more accurate than the reports given to VTS and the ability of VTS equipment to verify those reports. Note that at any time unreported hazards of which VTS personnel are unaware may confront mariners in the San Francisco VTS area.

All mariners are encouraged to read this manual prior to participating in the San Francisco VTS. In accordance with the National VTS regulations mariners must keep a copy of this manual readily available when operating in the VTS area. VTS asks for mariners' cooperation and welcomes suggestions as to how to improve this manual or the San Francisco VTS.

Send suggestions and/or comments to:

Commanding Officer
U. S. Coast Guard Vessel Traffic Service
Yerba Buena Island
San Francisco, California 94130-5078
(415) 556-2950 Fax:(415) 556-6851
Internet:
mmelanson@d11.uscg.mil
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SAN FRANCISCO VESSEL TRAFFIC SERVICE OPERATIONS

Concept of Operations

A. The primary function of VTS San Francisco is to instill good order and predictability on a waterway. This is accomplished by coordinating vessel movements through the collection, verification, organization, and dissemination of information. To accomplish this, VTS San Francisco uses the concept of a "continuum of control". This continuum consists of the following levels of control: Monitor, Inform, Recommend, and Direct.

(1) Monitor: Using radar, CCTV, and radiotelephone equipment, we monitor vessel traffic in the VTS Area. VTS also receives information from various sources on predicted vessel movements, hazards to navigation, aids to navigation discrepancies, and other information of interest to VTS users. Monitoring vessel traffic allows us to ensure that vessels are being navigated safely and efficiently in accordance with applicable regulations and navigation rules.

(2) Inform: We analyze the information we have gathered and then use that analysis to inform our participants. This is done at the user's request, when it appears necessary to the VTS personnel, or at regular intervals. The purpose of informing participants is to give them timely information to allow them to make decisions concerning the navigation of their vessels.

(3) Recommend: Almost all of VTS San Francisco operations are conducted at the monitor and inform levels. However, at certain times the VTS will recommend action be taken by a participant to prevent a potentially dangerous situation. Such recommendations are offered to assist the participant in avoiding hazardous situations early on. Recommendations are made on the premise that there is information available to VTS of which the participant may not be aware.

(4) Direct: On very rare occasions VTS will direct movement or actions of a participant. Direction would be given in cases when the VTC observes obvious violations of regulations or an obvious and immediately dangerous condition of which the participant is not or does not seem to be aware.

B. The ultimate responsibility for safe navigation of a vessel remains with the master or person in charge. When performing the functions discussed here, VTS is not relieving the master or person in charge of his or her responsibility to control vessel movement. At no time is that person relieved by the VTS of responsibilities assigned by the applicable Navigation Rules and other pertinent laws or regulations, or of the neglect of any precaution which may be required by the ordinary seaman, or by special circumstances of the case.

C. Fishing vessels and recreational vessels, although generally not required to participate in the VTS, are encouraged to monitor the VTS radio channels, as needed, to gather traffic movement information.

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INSHORE SECTOR PROCEDURES

A. VTS maintains a continuous radiotelephone watch on VHF-FM channels 12 (156.60 MHz), 13 (156.65 MHz), 14 (156.70 MHz) and 16 (156.80 MHz). The call sign is "SAN FRANCISCO TRAFFIC." Once communications are established, the abbreviated call sign "TRAFFIC" may be used. If communications on ch. 12, ch. 13 or ch. 14 are lost, call TRAFFIC on ch. 16 and be prepared to shift to another frequency. All reports should be in English and use the 24 hour clock system.

B. The VTS Area is separated into two sectors with a separate dedicated operating frequency for each sector. The Inshore Sector uses channel 14 and the Offshore Sector uses channel 12. Participation procedures for each of these sectors are outlined in the Inshore Sector Reporting Procedures and the Offshore Sector Reporting Procedures of this Users Manual.

C. In addition to monitoring the VTS dedicated frequency for the sector in which the vessel is operating, vessels that are required to participate in the Vessel Traffic Service must maintain a listening watch on channel 13. A listening watch on channel 16 is not required on vessels subject to the Vessel Bridge-to-Bridge Radiotelephone Act and participating in a Vessel Traffic Service system when the watch is maintained on both the vessel bridge-to-bridge frequency and a designated VTS frequency.

D. Nothing in these procedures contravenes or modifies the Vessel Bridge-to-Bridge Radiotelephone Regulations.

E. The Inshore Sector consists of the waters of the San Francisco Offshore Precautionary Area eastward to San Francisco Bay and its tributaries extending inland to the ports of Stockton, Sacramento, and Redwood City. Participation procedures for vessels in the Inshore Area are as follows.

1. Sailing Plan. A vessel shall provide a sailing plan to the VTS on channel 14 VHF-FM 15 minutes prior to getting underway from a berth or anchorage in the Inshore Sector. The Sailing Plan should contain the following information.

a. For power-driven vessels 40+ Meters (approx 131 ft) in length or when operating instructions require participation:

b. For a towing vessel 8 meters (approx 26 ft) or more in length if towing astern, towing alongside, or pushing ahead:

c. For a vessel certificated to carry 50 or more passengers for hire, engaged in trade report: (Call 5 minutes before entering the VTS area):


The passenger vessel may also request or decline a traffic report. If a request or decline of the report is not stated the VTS controller will provide a traffic report.

d. For a Marine Event comprised of committee boat, race deck, or an event organizer:

2. Position Reports shall be made:

3. Sailing Plan Deviation Report. A vessel must report:

4. Final Report. Upon docking, anchoring, mooring or departing the VTS Area, report the place to the VTC.

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Inshore Sector Reporting Points

Reporting points are locations where VMRS Users are directed to contact VTS. Additional reporting points may be required due to vessel impairments, meteorological conditions, or if VTS radar is inoperative.

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Providing Route Intentions

A. All vessels shall be aware of and follow the San Francisco Bay traffic routing system. This system consists of a Traffic Separation Scheme (TSS) offshore and Regulated Navigational Areas (RNAs) in the Inshore Sector (see pages 7 & 8). Any decision to deviate from the TSS or RNA must be made by the master or person in charge of the vessel. You shall notify the VTS prior to deviating from the TSS or RNA.

Excursion boats, ferries, and tour boats should comply
with the traffic lanes as closely as their routes allow.

[San Francisco Bay ferry traffic, 20 kb]1. The traffic lanes radiating seaward from the offshore precautionary area centered on the San Francisco Sea Buoy constitute a Traffic Separation Scheme (TSS) adopted by the International Maritime Organization (IMO). COLREGS Rule 10 applies to vessels in or near this TSS.

2. The geographical constraints of San Francisco Bay make implementation of a TSS impractical and unnecessarily restrictive on recreational and harbor tour boats. Instead, traffic flow within the Bay is guided by a series of RNAs.

B. Participants unable to follow the traffic lanes or procedures due to an emergency should maneuver as required to minimize the emergency and notify the VTS as soon as possible.

C. The recreational boating public have a legitimate expectation that ships will adhere to the traffic routing system. Therefore, particularly in central San Francisco Bay (where many boats are often present), the hazards of deviating from the routing system are very pronounced. VTS will recommend adherence to the RNAs whenever a proposal to deviate from the RNAs is based only on convenience. When a deviation does occur, VTS may make a safety broadcast on channels 14 and 16 VHF-FM to warn the boating public.

D. Charted recreation areas within the VTS Area shall be avoided by commercial vessels.

Vessels are required to file a Sailing Plan in accordance with 33 CFR 161.19. Included in the Sailing Plan is the intended route. In the San Francisco VTS area there are often several traffic lane or bridge span choices along a route to a given destination. Therefore, it is often difficult to specify an exact route upon initial check-in. Vessels required to use the traffic lanes shall normally provide traffic lane or bridge span intentions along the route as follows.

Offshore Traffic Separation Scheme

Provide intentions when outbound prior to passing Point Bonita. The usual outbound options are (see figure 6, pg 9):

Central Bay Traffic Lanes

[Central SF Bay RNAs, 8 kb]There are three lane options: The Deep Water Traffic Lane; Westbound Lane (south of Harding rock); Eastbound Lane (or south of Alcatraz). Provide intentions when approaching these lanes prior to passing the following points: Golden Gate Bridge, Point Blunt, or Blossom Rock buoy.

Oakland Bay Bridge

(West of Yerba Buena Island)

When approaching from the North, provide bridge span intentions prior to passing Blossom Rock buoy. When approaching from the south, provide span intentions prior to entering the precautionary area.

There are situations when a vessel will require more time to determine the best lane or span selection due to other vessels navigating in the area. In these cases, the vessel shall state that more time is required and then, as soon as practicable, provide intentions.

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Regulated Navigation Areas

The Coast Guard has established Regulated Navigation Areas (RNAs) within the San Francisco Bay Region to reduce vessel congestion where maneuvering room is limited. These RNAs increase navigational safety by organizing traffic flow patterns; reducing meeting, crossing, and overtaking situations between large vessels in constricted channels; and limiting vessel speed.

The RNAs generally apply to LARGE VESSELS (i.e. power-driven vessels of 1600 or more gross tons, or tugs with a tow of 1600 or more gross tons). When navigating within the RNAs, LARGE VESSELS shall:

All vessels operating within these RNA's are reminded of their responsibility to comply with Rule 9 of the Inland Navigation Rules.

[Central SF Bay RNAs, 8 kb]San Francisco Bay RNA

LARGE VESSELS shall use the indicated direction of travel within a given lane. Eastbound travel is permitted in the Eastbound Lane (EL), westbound travel is permitted in the Westbound Lane (WL), and east or westbound travel is permitted in the Deep Water (two-way) Traffic Lane (DWTL).

LARGE VESSELS shall use the DWTL if eastbound with a draft of 45 feet or greater or westbound with a draft of 28 feet or greater.

A LARGE VESSEL shall not meet, cross, or overtake another LARGE VESSEL within the DWTL when either vessel is a tank vessel in ballast, carrying certain dangerous cargoes, or bulk petroleum products (see 33 CFR 160.203).

Southampton Shoal/Richmond Harbor RNA

A LARGE VESSEL shall not meet, cross, or overtake another LARGE VESSEL within this RNA.

Oakland Harbor RNA

A LARGE VESSEL shall not meet, cross, or overtake another LARGE VESSEL within this RNA.

Pinole Shoal Channel RNA

[San Pablo Bay RNAs, 5 kb]The Pinole Shoal Channel RNA is reserved for navigation of vessels with a draft greater than 20 feet or tugs with tows drawing more than 20 feet. Vessels drawing less than 20 feet are not permitted within this RNA. A LARGE VESSEL shall not enter Pinole Shoal Channel RNA, if such entry would result in meeting, crossing, or overtaking another LARGE VESSEL, when either vessel is a tank vessel in ballast, carrying certain dangerous cargoes, or bulk petroleum products.

Southern Pacific Railroad Bridge RNA

(This RNA applies during periods of reduced visibility)

[Southern Pacific Railroad Bridge RNA, 3 kb] Eastbound

Eastbound LARGE VESSELS shall not transit through this RNA when visibility is less than 1,000 yards.

Westbound

Westbound LARGE VESSELS shall check visibility conditions within the RNA immediately prior to passing New York Point, and not proceed past Mallard Island until visibility improves to greater than 1,000 yards within the RNA. If the visibility drops below 1,000 yards during the transit, the vessel may proceed but must obtain permission to deviate from this RNA. Visibility is considered to be 1,000 yards or greater when both the Port of Benicia Pier and the Shell Martinez Pier can be seen from the Southern Pacific Railroad Bridge.

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OFFSHORE SECTOR PROCEDURES

The Offshore Sector area is formally defined as the ocean waters within a 38 nautical-mile radius of Mount Tamalpais (which is at 37deg 55.8min N 122deg 34.6min W) excluding the San Francisco Offshore Precautionary Area. (The San Francisco Offshore Precautionary Area is the area within a six-mile radius of the San Francisco Sea Buoy [SFSB].)

This translates roughly to an arc crossing the shoreline near Bodega Head, crossing Cordell Bank, then curving southward to pass about 30 nautical miles west of the San Francisco Sea Buoy, and curving eastward to cross the shoreline near Pescadero Point. This arc is shown on charts 18640 and 18680.

The shoreward boundary of the Offshore Sector is a line from Duxbury Point 180 degrees to the boundary of the San Francisco Offshore Precautionary Area, then following the boundary of the Precautionary Area past the "N," "W" and "S" buoys, and then from the boundary of the San Francisco Offshore Precautionary Area 090 degrees to Mussel Rock.

When your vessel is inbound, 15 minutes from the outermost reporting point (sector boundary) on your route, call VTS on channel 12 and report your sailing plan.

[VTS SF Offshore Sector, 5 kb] Sailing Plan

Give the following information in your sailing plan.

Sailing Plan Amplification Reports

When your vessel is at the next reporting point, call VTS. Give the following information.

Position Report

Inbound. When your vessel is at the "N," "W," or "S" buoy or abeam Duxbury Reef, call VTS on channel 12 and report: vessel name and position.

Outbound. When your vessel is at the outermost reporting point on your route, call VTS on channel 12 and report: vessel name and position.

Other Reports

If your vessel is conducting research, engaged in naval exercises, or doing other special operations in the Offshore Sector, you should report your Sailing Plan to VTS and include the nature of your operation. If you have an emergency on board your vessel or if you become aware of an emergency involving another vessel, report it to VTS.

When you are engaged in fishing you may report this fact to VTS. However, you are not required to do so unless your vessel fits into one of the categories described in 33 CFR 161.2.

Transiting Across the Offshore Sector

When you are transiting across the Offshore Sector and will not enter the San Francisco Offshore Precautionary Area, call VTS on channel 12 and report your Sailing Plan when you reach the first Offshore sector reporting point on your route.

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Offshore Vessel Traffic Advisories

VTS broadcasts the positions, courses, speeds, and estimated times of passing reporting points of all VTS Users who have reported to VTS in the Offshore Sector. VTS makes these advisories at minute 15 and minute 45 each hour. VTS strongly recommends that vessels in the area of the Offshore Sector listen to these broadcasts.

OFFSHORE Reporting Points

North

West

South

NOTE: When you are between the West and South areas, consider the outer limit of the Offshore Sector to be when your vessel is 30 nautical miles from the SFSB.

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CAPTAIN OF THE PORT ADVISORIES

Enforcement of Navigation Rules in San Francisco Bay

This advisory provides a listing of the major deep draft channels in San Francisco Bay and adjacent waters which the Captain of the Port considers to be "narrow channels or fairways" within the meaning of the International and Inland Rules of the Road.

Rule 9, in both the International and Inland Rules of the Road, provides requirements for vessels navigating in the vicinity of narrow channels or fairways. Vessels and powerboats less than 20 meters (approximately 65 feet), all sailboats, and vessels engaged in fishing shall not impede the passage of a vessel that can safely navigate only within a narrow channel or fairway. Additionally, a vessel shall not cross a narrow channel or fairway if such crossing impedes the passage of a vessel which can safely navigate only within that channel or fairway. The term "shall not impede" means a small craft must keep well clear and not hinder or interfere with the transit of larger vessels. Small craft and fishing vessels shall not anchor or fish in narrow channels if large vessels or barges being towed are transiting.

Coast Guard enforcement efforts, combined with a public education and information program, are further intended to draw public attention to the serious hazards created when large vessels are impeded by smaller vessels. This effort should result in an improved level of navigational safety and reduce the risk of collisions, groundings and their potential consequences.

The Captain of the Port considers the following areas to be "narrow channels or fairways" for the purpose of enforcing the International and Inland Rules of the Road. This list is not all-inclusive, but identifies areas where deep draft commercial and public vessels routinely operate. Included in this list and marked by an asterisk (*) are the Regulated Navigation Areas (RNAs) in San Francisco Bay which were recently designated in amendments to 33 CFR 162 and 165.

a. All traffic lanes and precautionary areas in the San Francisco Bay eastward of the San Francisco Approach Lighted Horn Buoy SF (LLNR 360) to the San Francisco - Oakland Bay Bridge and the Richmond - San Rafael Bridge, to include:

*b. Oakland Harbor Bar Channel including the Outer Harbor Entrance Channel and the Inner Harbor Entrance Channel.
c. Oakland Outer Harbor.
d. Oakland Inner Harbor from Inner Harbor Channel Light "5" (LLNR 4670) to, and including, the Brooklyn Basin South Channel.
e. Alameda Naval Air Station Channel in its entirety.
f. South San Francisco Bay Channels between the Central Bay Precautionary Area and Redwood Creek Entrance Light "2" (LLNR 5180).
g. Redwood Creek between Redwood Creek Entrance Light "2" (LLNR 5180) and Redwood Creek Daybeacon "21" (LLNR 5265).
*h. San Pablo Straight Channel from the Richmond-San Rafael Bridge to San Pablo Bay Channel Light "7" (LLNR 5900).
*i. Pinole Shoal Channel in San Pablo Bay between San Pablo Bay Channel Light "7" (LLNR 5900) and San Pablo Bay Channel Light "14" (LLNR 5935).
j. Carquinez Strait between San Pablo Bay Channel Light "14" (LLNR 5935) and the Benicia-Martinez Highway Bridge.
k. Mare Island Strait between Mare Island Strait Light "2" (LLNR 6095) and Mare Island Causeway Bridge.
l. Suisun Bay Channels between the Benicia-Martinez Highway Bridge and Suisun Bay Light "34" (LLNR 6655).
m. New York Slough between Suisun Bay Light "30" (LLNR 6585) and San Joaquin River Light "2" (LLNR 6670).
n. Sacramento River Deep Water Ship Channel from Suisun Bay Light "34" (LLNR 6655) to the Port of Sacramento.
o. San Joaquin River from San Joaquin River Light "2" (LLNR 6670) to the port of Stockton.

Rules of the Road Enforcement: Timely reporting and enforcement of Rules of the Road infractions promotes safer navigation. Vessel masters, pilots and operators are encouraged to report incidents which merit investigation. Reports will be fully investigated and may result in license suspension or revocation proceedings or the assessment of civil penalties.

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Pollution Prevention Regulations

This notice further clarifies the requirements under the Pollution Prevention Regulations of Title 33 Code of Federal Regulations Parts 154, 155, 156 and the Oil Pollution Act of 1990 (OPA-90) for vessels operating in the COTP San Francisco Bay Zone.

The Pollution Prevention Regulations contained in 33 CFR parts 154, 155, 156 and OPA 90 apply to facilities and vessels that conduct bulk oil or hazardous material transfers. Sections of 33 CFR give the Captain of the Port discretionary authority to impose additional requirements. Also, OPA 90 has instituted new regulations concerning the interpretations and requirements for the Captain of the Port San Francisco Zone. The Captain of the Port convened a working group to discuss the best implementation means of 33 CFR concerning bulk oil transfer operations. This COTP Notice is a summation of results from this working group. Questions or concerns relating to this notice may be addressed to the Captain of the Port in writing or directly through the Port Operations Department at (510) 437-3073.

a. ADVANCE NOTICE OF OIL AND HAZARDOUS MATERIAL TRANSFER [33 CFR 156.118]

The COTP San Francisco requires at least four hours notice prior to the time the barge or truck delivering the product to be transferred arrives at the transfer site. This applies to any mobile facility transfer (between tank truck and vessels) and any lightering or bunkering (vessel to vessel transfer). This four hour advance notice shall include: the time of the transfer, the duration and location of the transfer, the amount and type of product to be transferred. If the time of transfer changes by one hour or more, or if the transfer is canceled, the person in charge of the truck/vessel from which the product is being transferred shall immediately notify the COTP. Notification may be made either by phoning the 24-hour duty desk at (510) 437-3073 or by faxing the information to (510) 437-3072.

The COTP recognizes that at certain times transfers may need to be conducted prior to the necessary 4 hour advance notice. For these "emergency" type situations contact the Port Operations Office and request permission to conduct the transfer. Exceptions will be made on a case-by-case basis.

b. "LOADING OVER THE TOP" [33 CFR 156.120(g)]

Occasionally, vessels transfer cargo oil into deep tanks or remove settled petroleum products from contaminated cargo tanks through an open hatch. Due to the static electricity combustion hazards and the amount of hazardous fumes generated by free-falling petroleum products, vessels that regularly conduct these types of transfers shall comply with the fixed connection requirements of 33 CFR 156.120 (g). For those unusual situations where a vessel cannot comply with the fixed connection requirements of 33 CFR 156.120(g), the COTP may grant an alternative under 33 CFR 156.107 to allow the use of a "portable transfer system".

The vessel operator must notify the COTP at least 24 hours in advance of the scheduled transfer. Alternative for portable transfer systems will only be granted for the transfer of Grade D and E cargoes.

The "portable transfer system" should consist of the following:

  1. Hose piping which meets the requirements of 33 CFR 154.500 or portable piping which meets the requirements of 46 CFR 56.
  2. Connections which meet the requirements of 33 CFR 156.130.
  3. A closure, such as a manhole cover, Butterworth plate, flange, or deepwell pump stack that forms a vapor tight seal over the opening in the tank top through which the cargo is transferred. This closure shall be bolted in place and the hose and drop line should be connected to it.
  4. A metallic drop line that must be not higher above the bottom of the cargo tank or sump than 10 cm (approx. 4 in.) or the radius of the filling line, whichever is greater (not necessary for Grade E, edible vegetable or animal oils).
  5. Portable containment with barrel capacity at every connection on the weather deck or ashore.
  6. A shut off at or near the point of entry into the tank.

Do not commence the transfer until a representative of the COTP examines the transfer arrangement and determines that adequate containment measures, which could include booming the vessel, have been undertaken.

c. PLUGGING DRAINS AND SCUPPERS PRIOR TO TRANSFER [33 CFR 156.120 (o)]

Part 156.120(o) requires tank vessels and barges to close all scuppers and drains within the containment by suitable mechanical means prior to any transfer operations. Wooden or other like plugs may be used provided cement is applied uniformly around the plug in such a manner that spilled oil will not leak through. Do not use rags or other easily permeated materials.

d. PERSON-IN-CHARGE OF TRANSFER OPERATION [33 CFR 155.700, 155.710, 156.120(t)(1)]

Regulations require that the Person-in-Charge (PIC) of an oil or HAZMAT transfer be present at the site of transfer and immediately available to the transfer personnel during all evolutions.

"Present at the Site" is defined as the PIC being (1) within line of sight of the actual transfer operation; and (2) be in constant communication with the vessel PIC.

Tankermen may:
(1) conduct brief business in the barge / vessel house such as short log entries, recording ullages, etc., but not preventive maintenance, receipt writing, or any activities that will keep the PIC from continuously monitoring the operation.
(2) make brief rounds of the vessel's engine-room if on a tank barge.

When Coast Guard Boarding Officers board a barge and do not see persons on deck they will wait for three (3) minutes. If the PIC is not seen within that timeframe the PIC will be deemed not present at the site of the transfer operation. In such a case, the operation may be shutdown or a Report of Violation may be processed. The PIC must be on-deck and fully aware of all aspects of the transfer operation from start to finish.

OPA-90 requires a Qualified Individual be designated for every vessel which carries oil as cargo. The PIC may be the Qualified Individual (Ql) but if the PIC and Ql are not one and the same, only the PIC is required to be at the site of the transfer operation.

e. BUNKERING OF VESSELS AT ANCHORAGE

Bunkering of vessels at anchorage within the Bay, will only be conducted in Anchorage Nine. Numerous environmentally sensitive areas in San Francisco Bay, necessitates that bunkering be conducted in an area that affords the best opportunity for containment, and the recovery of oil released into the water.

f. LIGHTERING ZONES AND ADVANCE NOTICE OF LIGHTERING [33 CFR 156.215 AND OPA-90]

Part 156.215 requires the master, owner or agent of the vessel to be lightered to give at least 24 hours notice to the COTP prior to arrival in the lightering zone. The notice must include:

  1. The vessel's name, call sign or official number and registry;
  2. The cargo type (if oil) or shipping name (if hazardous material) and the approximate amount on board;
  3. The number of transfers expected;
  4. The lightering location to be used;
  5. The estimated time of arrival in the lightering location;
  6. The estimated duration of transfer operations;
  7. The name and destination of service vessel(s) ; and
  8. The name and phone number of the Qualified Individual.

Due to the numerous environmentally sensitive areas within the Bay, lightering will only be allowed in Anchorage Nine. Lightering in other Anchorages will be considered on a case by case basis. Each case requested must be submitted to the Captain of the Port in writing, no later than 24 hours prior to the estimated start time.

If a barge needs to conduct an "immediate" lightering because of unforeseen reasons (change in schedule, etc.) the barge operator should contact the Chief, Port Operations and request permission to conduct the lightering. Approval will be granted on a case-by-case basis.

g. THE DECLARATION OF INSPECTION [33 CFR 156.120 and 156.150]

If it is impracticable to inspect equipment on another PIC's vessel, each PIC shall verbally discuss each item on the DOI. The intent of the double signature on a DOI is that each party has, at the very least, discussed and confirmed that all the requirements on the DOI have been met.

If an item cannot reasonably be inspected by the barge PIC, a mark of N/A should be placed vice a signature on a DOI form which includes two columns (one for the deliverer and one for the receiver). If the DOI is a form which requires only check marks in appropriate boxes and a signature of both PICs at the bottom, both PICs should sign and not use "N/A".

4. Summary: Compliance with the Pollution Prevention Regulations contained in 33 CFR 154, 155, 156, OPA-90 and this COTP Public Advisory should reduce the possibilities of a pollution incident and decrease the potential damage to the environment should one occur.

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Anchorages

A. VTS San Francisco administers the anchorages in the VTS area for the COTP. Anchorage regulations for the service area are found in Title 33 CFR 110.224. These regulations describe the boundaries of designated anchorage areas, impose certain restrictions on anchoring, and require various reports from vessels anchoring both in and outside of the designated anchorages. Vessels which have notified the VTC of their actions will be considered in compliance with the reporting requirements of 33 CFR 110.224.

B. VTS administration of the anchorages includes ensuring proper separation of anchored vessels to prevent their swinging or dragging into each other. The COTP has established a mandatory separation of 750 yards around anchored vessels over 300 gross tons. Vessels anchoring within 750 yards, or which "settle out" within 750 yards of another vessel will be directed by the VTS to re-anchor at a greater distance. The vessel which was the last to arrive will normally be the one required to move.

C. A vessel anchoring outside an established anchorage area for reason of imminent peril or heavy fog should be positioned outside the vessel traffic lanes or ship channel insofar as practicable. If necessary to anchor within a traffic lane or channel, the vessel should be positioned as near the edge of the lane or channel as practicable. Vessels anchoring outside of established anchorages should notify the VTC as soon as possible.

D. When the wind is above 25 knots all vessels over 300 gross tons anchored in San Francisco Bay must maintain a continuous radiotelephone watch on VHF-FM ch. 13 and ch. 14.

E. Vessels anchoring in any anchorage are required to reserve the deeper portions of the anchorage for vessels of deeper draft. This becomes particularly important in Anchorage 9 since tankers with drafts up to 50 feet often anchor there to conduct lightering. Therefore, the VTC advises vessels anchoring in Anchorage 9 to anchor as far east or south as safety will allow. This will ensure that the deeper western side of the anchorage will be available for those deep draft vessels needing it. Shallow-draft vessels may be required to move if the area in which they are anchored is needed by a vessel of deeper draft.

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Federal Regulations

DEPARTMENT OF
TRANSPORTATION

Coast Guard 33CFR Parts 1, 26, 160, 161, 162, 164, and 165

Portions omitted are not applicable to VTS San Francisco

PART 1 - GENERAL PROVISIONS

1.01-30 Captains of the Port. * * * * *

(a) Captains of the Port and their representatives enforce within their respective areas port safety and security and marine environmental protection regulations, including, without limitation, regulations for the protection and security of vessels, harbor, and waterfront facilities; anchorages; security of vessels; waterfront facilities; security zones; safety zones; regulated navigation areas; deepwater ports; water pollution, and ports and waterways safety.
(b) Subject to the supervision of the cognizant Captain of the Port and District Commander, Commanding Officers, Vessel Traffic Services, are delegated authority under the Ports and Waterways Safety Act to discharge the duties of the Captain of the Port that involve directing the operation, movement, and anchoring of vessels within a Vessel Traffic Service area, including management of vessel traffic within anchorages, regulated navigation areas and safety zones, and to enforce Vessel Traffic Service and ports and waterways safety regulations. This authority may be redelegated.
(c) Under authority conferred by 14 U.S.C. 89, any commissioned, warrant or petty officer of the United States Coast Guard may assist in discharging the duties of the captain of the port in any port or adjacent navigable waters of the United States. They will do so under the supervision of the cognizant captain of the port, or representative of the captain of the port, if there be one for the locality involved.

PART 26 - VESSEL BRIDGE-to-BRIDGE RADIOTELEPHONE REGULATIONS

26.01 Purpose

(a) The purpose of this part is to implement the provisions of the Vessel Bridge-to-Bridge Radio Telephone Act. This part:
(1) requires the use of the vessel bridge-to-bridge radiotelephone;
(2) provides the Coast Guard's interpretation of the meaning of important terms in the ACT;
(3) Prescribes the procedures for applying for an exemption from the Act and the regulations issued under the Act and a listing of exemptions .
(b) Nothing in this part relieves any person from the obligation of complying with the Rules of the Road and the applicable pilot rules.

26.02 Definitions.

For the purposes of this part and interpreting the Act:
Secretary means the Secretary of the Department in which the Coast Guard is operating;
Act means the "Vessel Bridge-to-Bridge Radiotelephone Act", 33 U.S.C. sections 1201-1208;
Length is measured from end to end over the deck excluding sheer;
Power-driven vessel means any vessel propelled by machinery;
Towing vessel means any commercial vessel engaged in towing another vessel astern, alongside, or by pushing ahead;
Vessel Traffic Services (VTS) means a service implemented under Part 161 of this chapter by the United States Coast Guard designed to improve the safety and efficiency of vessel traffic and to protect the environment. The VTS has the capability to interact with marine traffic and respond to traffic situations developing in the VTS area.
Vessel Traffic Service Area or VTS Area means the geographical area encompassing a specific VTS area of service as described in Part 161 of this chapter. This area of service may be subdivided into sectors for the purpose of allocating responsibility to individual Vessel Traffic Centers or to identify different operating requirements.
NOTE: Although regulatory jurisdiction is limited to the navigable waters of the United States, certain vessels will be encouraged or may be required, as a condition of port entry, to report beyond this area to facilitate traffic management within the VTS area.

26.03 Radiotelephone required. * * * * *

(a) Unless an exemption is granted under 26.09 and except as provided in paragraph (a) (4) of this section, this part applies to:
(1) Every power-driven vessel of 20 meters or over in length while navigating;
(2) Every vessel of 100 gross tons and upward carrying one or more passengers for hire while navigating;
(3) Every towing vessel of 26 feet or over in length while navigating; and
(4) Every dredge and floating plant engaged in or near a channel or fairway in operations likely to restrict or affect navigation of other vessels except for an unmanned or intermittently manned floating plant under the control of the dredge.
(b) Every vessel, dredge, or floating plant described in paragraph (a) of this section must have a radiotelephone on board capable of operation from its navigational bridge, or in the case of a dredge, from its main control station, and capable of transmitting and receiving on the frequency or frequencies within the 156-162 megahertz band using the classes of emissions designated by the Federal Communications Commission for the exchange of navigation information.
(c) The radiotelephone required by paragraph (b) of this section must be carried on board the described vessels, dredges, and floating plants upon the navigable waters of the United States.
(d) The radiotelephone required by paragraph (b) of this section must be capable of transmitting and receiving on VHF-FM channel 22A (157.1 MHz).
(e)************
(f) In addition to the radiotelephone required by paragraph (b) of this section, each vessel described in paragraph (a) of this section while transiting any waters within a Vessel Traffic Service Area, must have on board a radiotelephone capable of transmitting and receiving on the VTS designated frequency in Table 26.03(f) (VTS Call Signs, Designated Frequencies, and Monitoring Areas).
NOTE: A single VHF-FM radio capable of scanning or sequential monitoring (often referred to as "dual watch" capability) will not meet the requirements for two radios.


Table 26.03(f) - Vessel Traffic Service (VTS) Call Signs, Designated Frequencies, and Monitoring Areas

Vessel Traffic Service (VTS) Call Sign: San Francisco Traffic

Designated Frequencies: Monitoring Area for each frequency
156.600 MHz (Ch. 12) Offshore Sector: The offshore waters within a 38 nautical mile radius from Mount Tamalpais (37deg 55.8min N, 122deg 34.6min W) excluding the San Francisco Offshore Precautionary Area.
156.700 MHz (Ch. 14) Inshore Sector: The waters of the San Francisco Offshore Precautionary Area eastward to San Francisco Bay including its tributaries extending to the ports of Stockton, Sacramento and Redwood City.

Note: (1) In the event of a communications failure either by the vessel traffic center or the vessel or radio congestion on a designated VTS frequency communications may be established on an alternative VTS frequency. The bridge-to-bridge navigational frequency, 156.650 MHz (Channel 13), is monitored in each VTS area; and it may be used as an alternate frequency, however, only to the extent that doing so provides a level of safety beyond that provided by other means.
(2) Designated frequency monitoring is required within U.S. navigable waters. In areas which are outside the U.S. navigable waters, designated frequency monitoring is voluntary. However, prospective VTS Users are encouraged to monitor the designated frequency.


26.04 Use of the designated frequency

(a) No person may use the frequency designated by the Federal Communications Commission under section 8 of the Act, 33 USC 1207 (a), to transmit any information other than information necessary for the safe navigation of vessels or necessary tests.
(b) Each person who is required to maintain a listening watch under section 5 of this Act shall, when necessary, transmit and confirm, on the designated frequency, the intentions of this vessel and other information necessary for the safe navigation of vessels.
(c) Nothing in these regulations may be construed as prohibiting the use of the designated frequency to communicate with shore stations to obtain or furnish information necessary for the safe navigation of vessels.
(d) On the navigable waters of the United States, channel 13 (156.65 MHz) is the designated frequency required to be monitored in accordance with 26.05.
(e) On those navigable waters of the United States within a VTS area, the designated VTS frequency is an additional designated frequency required to be monitored in accordance with 26.05.
NOTE: As stated in 47 CFR 80.148(b), a VHF watch on Channel 16 (156.800 MHz) is not required on vessels subject to the Vessel Bridge-to-Bridge Radiotelephone Act and participating in a Vessel Traffic Service (VTS) system when the watch is maintained on both the vessel bridge-to-bridge frequency and a designated VTS frequency.

26.05 Use of radiotelephone

Section 5 of the Act states:
(a) The radiotelephone required by this Act is for the exclusive use of the master or person in charge of the vessel, or the person designated by the master or person in charge to pilot or direct the movement of the vessel, who shall maintain a listening watch on the designated frequency. Nothing contained herein shall be interpreted as precluding the use of portable radiotelephone equipment to satisfy the requirements of the act.

26.06 Maintenance of radiotelephone; failure of radiotelephone

Section 6 of the Act states:
(a) Whenever radiotelephone capability is required by this Act, a vessel's radiotelephone equipment shall be maintained in effective operating condition. If the radiotelephone equipment carried aboard a vessel ceases to operate the master shall exercise due diligence to restore it or cause it to be restored to effective operating condition at the earliest practicable time. The failure of a vessel's radiotelephone equipment shall not, in itself, constitute a violation of this Act, nor shall it obligate the master of any vessel to moor or anchor his vessel; however, the loss of radiotelephone capability shall be given consideration in the navigation of the vessel.

26.07 Communications.

No person may use the services of, and no person may serve as, a person required to maintain a listening watch under section 5 of the Act, 33 U.S.C. 1204, unless the person can communicate in the English language.

26.08 Exemption procedures

(a) Any person may petition for an exemption from any provision of the Act or this part;
(b) Each petition must be submitted in writing to U.S. Coast Guard, Office of Navigation Safety and Waterway Services, 2100 Second Street SW, Washington, DC 20593-0001, and must state;
(1) The provisions of the Act or this part from which an exemption is requested; and
(2) The reasons why marine navigation will not be adversely affected if the exemption is granted and if the exemption relates to a local communications system how that system would fully comply with the intent of the concept of the Act but would not conform in detail if the exemption is granted.

26.09 List of exemptions.

***************

26.10 Penalties

Section 9 of the Act states:
(a) Whoever, being the master or person in charge of a vessel subject to the Act, fails to enforce or comply with the Act or the regulation hereunder; or whoever, being designated by the master or person in charge of a vessel subject to the Act to pilot or direct the movement of a vessel fails to enforce or comply with the Act or the regulation s hereunder - is liable to a civil penalty of not more than $500 to be assessed by the Secretary.
(b) Every vessel navigated in violation of the Act or the regulations hereunder is liable to a civil penalty of not more then $500 to be assessed by the Secretary, for which the vessel may be proceeded against in any District Court of the United States having jurisdiction;.
(c) Any penalty assessed under this section may be remitted or mitigated by the Secretary, upon such terms as he may deem proper.

PART 160 - PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY: GENERAL

160.3 Definitions.

For the purposes of this subchapter:
Bulk means material in any quantity that is shipped, stored, or handled without the benefit of package, label, mark or count and carried in integral or fixed independent tanks.
Captain of the Port means the Coast Guard officer designated by the Commandant to command a Captain of the Port Zone as described in part 3 of this chapter.
Commandant means the Commandant of the United States Coast Guard.
Commanding Officer, Vessel Traffic Services means the Coast Guard officer designated by the Commandant to command a Vessel Traffic Service (VTS) as described in part 161 of this chapter.
Deviation means any departure from any rule in this subchapter.
District Commander means the Coast Guard officer designated by the Commandant to command a Coast Guard District as described in part 3 of this chapter.
ETA means estimated time of arrival.
Length of Tow means, when towing with a hawser, the length in feet from the stern of the towing vessel to the stern of the last vessel in tow. When pushing ahead or towing alongside, length of tow means the tandem length in feet of the vessels in tow excluding the length of the towing vessel.
Person means an individual, firm, corporation, association, partnership, or governmental entity.
State means each of the several States of the United States, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, Guam, American Samoa, the United States Virgin Islands, the Trust Territories of the Pacific Islands, the Commonwealth of the Northern Marianas Islands, and any other commonwealth, territory, or possession of the United States.
Tanker means a self-propelled tank vessel constructed or adapted primarily to carry oil or hazardous materials in bulk in the cargo spaces.
Tank Vessel means a vessel that is constructed or adapted to carry, or that carries, oil or hazardous material in bulk as cargo or cargo residue.
Vehicle means every type of conveyance capable of being used as a means of transportation on land. Vessel means every description of watercraft or other artificial contrivance used, or capable of being used, as a means of transportation on water.
Vessel Traffic Services (VTS) means a service implemented under Part 161 of this chapter by the United States Coast Guard designed to improve the safety and efficiency of vessel traffic and to protect the environment. The VTS has the capability to interact with marine traffic and respond to traffic situations developing in the VTS area.
Vessel Traffic Service Area or VTS Area means the geographical area encompassing a specific VTS area of service as described in Part 161 of this chapter. This area of service may be subdivided into sectors for the purpose of allocating responsibility to individual Vessel Traffic Centers or to identify different operating requirements.
NOTE: Although regulatory jurisdiction is limited to the navigable waters of the United States, certain vessels will be encouraged or may be required, as a condition of port entry, to report beyond this area to facilitate traffic management within the VTS area.
VTS Special Area means a waterway within a VTS area in which special operating requirements apply.

160.5 Delegations.
* * * * *

(d) Subject to the supervision of the cognizant Captain of the Port and District Commander, Commanding Officers, Vessel Traffic Services are delegated authority under 33 CFR 1.01-30 to discharge the duties of the Captain of the Port that involve directing the operation, movement, and anchorage of vessels within a Vessel Traffic Service area including management of vessel traffic within anchorages, regulated navigation areas and safety zones, and to enforce Vessel Traffic Service and ports and waterways safety regulations. This authority may be exercised by Vessel Traffic Center personnel. The Vessel Traffic Center may, within the Vessel Traffic Service area, provide information, make recommendations, or, to a vessel required under Part 161 of this chapter to participate in a Vessel Traffic Service, issue an order, including an order to operate or anchor as directed; require the vessel to comply with orders issued; specify times of entry, movement or departure; restrict operations as necessary for safe operation under the circumstances; or take other action necessary for control of the vessel and the safety of the port or of the marine environment.

PART 161 - VESSEL TRAFFIC SERVICES GENERAL RULES

161.1 Purpose and Intent.

(a) The purpose of this part is to promulgate regulations implementing and enforcing certain sections of the Ports and Waterways Safety Act (PWSA) setting up a national system of Vessel Traffic Services that will enhance navigation, vessel safety, and marine environmental protection, and promote safe vessel movement by reducing the potential for collisions, rammings, and groundings, and the loss of lives and property associated with these incidents within VTS areas established hereunder.
(b) Vessel Traffic Services provide the mariner with information related to the safe navigation of a waterway. This information, coupled with the mariner's compliance with the provisions set forth in this part, enhances the safe routing of vessels through congested waterways or waterways of particular hazard. Under certain circumstances, a VTS may issue directions to control the movement of vessels in order to minimize the risk of collision between vessels, or damage to property or the environment.
(c) The owner, operator, charterer, master, or person directing the movement of a vessel remains at all times responsible for the manner in which the vessel is operated and maneuvered, and is responsible for the safe navigation of the vessel under all circumstances. Compliance with these rules or with a direction of the VTS is at all times contingent upon the exigencies of safe navigation.
(d) Nothing in this part is intended to relieve any vessel, owner, operator, charterer, master, or person directing the movement of a vessel from the consequences of any neglect to comply with this part or any other applicable law or regulation (e.g., the International Regulations for Prevention of Collisions at Sea, 1972 (72 COLREGS) or the Inland Navigation Rules) or of the neglect of any precaution which may be required by the ordinary practice of seamen, or by the special circumstances of the case.

161.2 Definitions.

For the purposes of this part:
Cooperative Vessel Traffic Services(CVTS) means the system of vessel traffic management established and jointly operated by the United States and Canada within adjoining waters. In addition, CVTS facilitates traffic movement and anchorages, avoids jurisdictional disputes, and renders assistance in emergencies in adjoining United States and Canadian waters.
Hazardous Vessel Operating Condition means any condition related to a vessel's ability to safely navigate or maneuver, and includes, but is not limited to:
(a) The absence or malfunction of vessel operating equipment, such as propulsion machinery, steering gear, radar system, gyro compass, depth sounding device, automatic radar plotting aid (ARPA), radiotelephone, automated dependent surveillance equipment, navigational lighting, sound signaling devices or similar equipment.
(b) Any condition on board the vessel likely to impair navigation, such as lack of current nautical charts and publications, personnel shortage, or similar condition.
(c) Vessel characteristics that affect or restrict maneuverability, such as cargo arrangement, trim, loaded condition, under keel clearance, speed, or similar characteristics.
Precautionary Area means a routing measure comprising an area within defined limits where vessels must navigate with particular caution and within which the direction of traffic may be recommended.
Towing Vessel means any commercial vessel engaged in towing another vessel astern, alongside, or by pushing ahead.
Vessel Movement Reporting System (VMRS) is a system used to manage and track vessel movements within a VTS area. This is accomplished by a vessel providing information under established procedures as set forth in this part, or as directed by the VTS.
Vessel Movement Reporting System (VMRS) User means a vessel, or an owner, operator, charterer, master, or person directing the movement of a vessel, that is required to participate in a VMRS within a VTS area. VMRS participation is required for:
(a) every power-driven vessel of 40 meters (approximately 131 feet) or more in length, while navigating;
(b) every towing vessel of 8 meters (approximately 26 feet) or more in length, while navigating; or
(c) every vessel certificated to carry 50 or more passengers for hire, when engaged in trade.
Vessel Traffic Center (VTC) means the shorebased facility that operates the vessel traffic service for the Vessel Traffic Service area or sector within such an area.
Vessel Traffic Services (VTS) means a service implemented by the United States Coast Guard designed to improve the safety and efficiency of vessel traffic and to protect the environment. The VTS has the capability to interact with marine traffic and respond to traffic situations developing in the VTS area.
Vessel Traffic Service Area or VTS Area means the geographical area encompassing a specific VTS area of service. This area of service may be subdivided into sectors for the purpose of allocating responsibility to individual Vessel Traffic Centers or to identify different operating requirements.
NOTE: Although regulatory jurisdiction is limited to the navigable waters of the United States, certain vessels will be encouraged or may be required, as a condition of port entry, to report beyond this area to facilitate traffic management within the VTS area.
VTS Special Area means a waterway within a VTS area in which special operating requirements apply.
VTS User means a vessel, or an owner, operator, charterer, master, or person directing the movement of a vessel, that is:
(a) subject to the Vessel Bridge-to-Bridge Radiotelephone Act; or
(b) required to participate in a VMRS within a VTS area (VMRS User).
VTS User's Manual means the manual established and distributed by the VTS to provide the mariner with a description of the services offered and rules in force for that VTS. Additionally, the manual may include chartlets showing the area and sector boundaries, general navigational information about the area, and procedures, radio frequencies, reporting provisions and other information which may assist the mariner while in the VTS area.

161.3 Applicability.

The provisions of this subpart shall apply to each VTS User and may also apply to any vessel while underway or at anchor on the navigable waters of the United States within a VTS area, to the extent the VTS considers necessary.

161.4 Requirement to carry the rules.

Each VTS User shall carry on board and maintain for ready reference a copy of these rules.
NOTE: These rules are contained in the applicable U.S. Coast Pilot, the VTS User's Manual which may be obtained by contacting the appropriate VTS, and periodically published in the Local Notice to Mariners. The VTS User's Manual and the World VTS Guide, an International Maritime Organization (IMO) recognized publication, contain additional information which may assist the prudent mariner while in the appropriate VTS area.

161.5 Deviations from the rules.

(a) Requests to deviate from any provision in this part, either for an extended period of time or if anticipated before the start of a transit, must be submitted in writing to the appropriate District Commander. Upon receipt of the written request, the District Commander may authorize a deviation if it is determined that such a deviation provides a level of safety equivalent to that provided by the required measure or is a maneuver considered necessary for safe navigation under the circumstances. An application for an authorized deviation must state the need and fully describe the proposed alternative to the required measure.
(b) Requests to deviate from any provision in this part due to circumstances that develop during a transit or immediately proceeding a transit, may be made verbally to the appropriate VTS Commanding Officer. Requests to deviate shall be made as far in advance as practicable. Upon receipt of the request, the VTS Commanding Officer may authorize a deviation if it is determined that, based on vessel handling characteristics, traffic density, radar contacts, environmental conditions and other relevant information, such a deviation provides a level of safety equivalent to that provided by the required measure or is a maneuver considered necessary for safe navigation under the circumstances.

Services, VTS Measures, and Operating Requirements

161.10 Services.

To enhance navigation and vessel safety, and to protect the marine environment, a VTS may issue advisories, or respond to vessel requests for information, on reported conditions within the VTS area, such as:
(a) Hazardous conditions or circumstances;
(b) Vessel congestion;
(c) Traffic density;
(d) Environmental conditions;
(e) Aids to navigation status;
(f) Anticipated vessel encounters;
(g) Another vessel's name, type, position, hazardous vessel operating conditions, if applicable, and intended navigation movements, as reported;
(h) Temporary measures in effect;
(i) A description of local harbor operations and conditions, such as ferry routes, dredging, and so forth;
(j) Anchorage availability; or
(k) Other information or special circumstances.

161.11 VTS Measures.

(a) A VTS may issue measures or directions to enhance navigation and vessel safety and to protect the marine environment, such as, but not limited to:
(1) Designating temporary reporting points and procedures;
(2) Imposing vessel operating requirements; or
(3) Establishing vessel traffic routing schemes.
(b) During conditions of vessel congestion, restricted visibility, adverse weather, or other hazardous circumstances, a VTS may control, supervise, or otherwise manage traffic, by specifying times of entry, movement, or departure to, from, or within a VTS area.

161.12 Vessel Operating Requirements.

(a) Subject to the exigencies of safe navigation, a VTS User shall comply with all measures established or directions issued by a VTS.
(1) If, in a specific circumstance, a VTS User is unable to safely comply with a measure or direction issued by the VTS, the VTS User may deviate only to the extent necessary to avoid endangering persons, property or the environment. The deviation shall be reported to the VTS as soon as is practicable.
(b) When not exchanging communications, a VTS User must maintain a listening watch as required by 26.04(e) of this chapter on the VTS frequency designated in Table 161.12(b) (VTS Call Signs, Designated Frequencies, and Monitoring Areas). In addition, the VTS User must respond promptly when hailed and communicate in the English language.
NOTE: As stated in 47 CFR 80.148(b), a VHF watch on Channel 16 (156.800 MHz) is not required on vessels subject to the Vessel Bridge-to-Bridge Radiotelephone Act and participating in a Vessel Traffic Service (VTS) system when the watch is maintained on both the vessel bridge-to-bridge frequency and a designated VTS frequency.
(c) As soon as is practicable, a VTS User shall notify the VTS of any of the following:
(1) A marine casualty as defined in 47 CFR 4.05-1;
(2) Involvement in the ramming of a fixed or floating object;
(3) A pollution incident as defined in 151.15 of this chapter;
(4) A defect or discrepancy in an aid to navigation;
(5) A hazardous condition as defined in 160.203 of this chapter;
(6) Improper operation of vessel equipment required by Part 164 of this chapter;
(7) A situation involving hazardous materials for which a report is required by 49 CFR 176.48; and
(8) A hazardous vessel operating condition as defined in 161.2.

161.13. VTS Special Area Operating Requirements.

The following operating requirements apply within a VTS Special Area:
(a) A VTS User shall, if towing astern, do so with as short a hawser as safety and good seamanship permits.
(b) A VMRS User shall:
(1) Not enter or get underway in the area without prior approval of the VTS;
(2) Not enter a VTS Special Area if a hazardous vessel operating condition or circumstance exists;
(3) Not meet, cross, or overtake any other VMRS User in the area without prior approval of the VTS; and
(4) Before meeting, crossing, or overtaking any other VMRS User in the area, communicate on the designated vessel bridge-to-bridge radiotelephone frequency, intended navigation movements, and any other information necessary in order to make safe passing arrangements. This requirement does not relieve a vessel of any duty prescribed by the International Regulations for Prevention of Collisions at Sea, 1972 (72 COLREGS) or the Inland Navigation Rules.

Subpart B Vessel Movement Reporting System

161.15 Purpose and Intent.

(a) A Vessel Movement Reporting System (VMRS) is a system used to manage and track vessel movements within a VTS area. This is accomplished by requiring that vessels provide information under established procedures as set forth in this part, or as directed by the VTS.
(b) To avoid imposing an undue reporting burden or unduly congesting radiotelephone frequencies, reports shall be limited to information which is essential to achieve the objectives of the VMRS. These reports are consolidated into four reports (sailing plan, position, sailing plan deviation and final).

161.16 Applicability

The provisions of this subpart shall apply to the following VMRS Users:
(a) Every power-driven vessel of 40 meters (approximately 131 feet) or more in length, while navigating;
(b) Every towing vessel of 8 meters (approximately 26 feet) or more in length, while navigating; or
(c) Every vessel certificated to carry 50 or more passengers for hire, when engaged in trade.

161.17 Definitions.

As used in this subpart: Published means available in a widely-distributed and publicly available medium (e.g., VTS User's Manual, ferry schedule, Notice to Mariners).

161.18 Reporting Requirements.

(a) A VTS may:
(1) Direct a vessel to provide any of the information set forth in Table 161.18(a) (IMO Standard Ship Reporting System) (below);
(2) Establish other means of reporting for those vessels unable to report on the designated frequency; or
(3) Require reports from a vessel in sufficient time to allow advance vessel traffic planning.
(b) All reports required by this part shall be made as soon as is practicable on the frequency designated in Table 161.12(b) (VTS Call Signs, Designated Frequencies, and Monitoring Areas).
(c) When not exchanging communications, a VMRS User must maintain a listening watch as described in 26.04(e) of this chapter on the frequency designated in Table 161.12(b) (VTS Call Signs. Designated Frequencies, and Monitoring Areas). In addition, the VMRS User must respond promptly when hailed and communicate in the English language.
NOTE: As stated in 47 CFR 80.148(b), a VHF watch on Channel 16 (156.800 MHz) is not required on vessels subject to the Vessel Bridge-to-Bridge Radiotelephone Act and participating in a Vessel Traffic Service (VTS) system when the watch is maintained on hot h the vessel bridge-to-bridge frequency and a designated VTS frequency.
(d) When reports required by this part include time information, such information shall be given using the local time zone in effect and the 24-hour military clock system.


TABLE 161.18(a) - THE IMO STANDARD SHIP REPORTING SYSTEM
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Code Short Meaning Long Meaning
ALPHA Ship Name, call sign or ship station identity, and flag

Transfer interrupted!

Date and time of event A 6 digit group giving day of month (first two digits), hours and minutes (last four digits). If other than UTC state time zone use
CHARLIE Position A 4 digit group giving latitude in degrees and minutes suffixed with N (north) or S(south) and a 5 digit group giving longitude in degrees and minutes suffixed with E teas t) or W (west); or
DELTA Position True bearing (first 3 digits) and distance (state distance) in nautical miles from a clearly identified landmark (state landmark)
ECHO True course A 3 digit group
FOXTROT Speed in knots and tenths of knots A 3 digit group tenths of knots
GOLF Port of Departure Name of last port of call
HOTEL Date, time and point of entry into system Entry time expressed as in (B) and into the entry position expressed as in (C) or (D)
INDIA Destination and expected time of arrival Name of port and date time time of arrival group expressed as in (B)
JULIET Pilot State whether a deep sea or local pilot is on board
KILO Date, time and point of exit from system Exit time expressed as in (B) and exit position expressed as in (C) or (D)
LIMA Route information Intended track
MIKE Radio State in full names of communications stations/frequencies guarded
TABLE 161.18(a) - THE IMO STANDARD SHIP REPORTING SYSTEM (continued)
Code Short Meaning Long Meaning
NOVEMBER Time of next report Date time group expressed as in (B)
OSCAR Maximum present static draught in meters 4 digit group giving meters and centimeters
PAPA Cargo on board Cargo and brief details of any dangerous cargoes as well as harmful substances and gases that could endanger persons or the environment
QUEBEC Defects, damage deficiencies or limitations Brief detail of defects, damage, deficiencies or other limitations
ROMEO Description of pollution dangerous goods lost Brief details of type of pollution (oil, chemicals, etc) or dangerous goods lost overboard; position expressed as overboard in (C) or (D)
SIERRA Weather conditions Brief details of weather and sea conditions prevailing
TANGO Ship's representative and/or owner Details of name and particulars of ship's representative and/or owner for provision of information
UNIFORM Ship size and type Details of length, breadth, tonnage, and type, etc., as required
VICTOR Medical personnel Doctor, physician's assistant, nurse, no medic
WHISKEY Total number of persons on board State number
XRAY Miscellaneous Any other information as appropriate. [i.e., a detailed description of a planned operation, which may include: its duration; effective area; any restrictions to navigation; notification procedures for approaching vessels; in addition, for a towing operation: configuration, length of the tow, available horsepower, etc.; for a dredge or floating plant: configurat ion of pipeline, mooring configuration, number of assist vessels, etc.

161.19 Sailing Plan (SP).

Unless otherwise stated, at least 15 minutes before navigating a VTS area, a vessel must report the:
(a) Vessel name and type;
(b) Position;
(c) Destination and ETA;
(d) Intended route;
(e) Time and point of entry; and
(f) Dangerous cargo on board or in its tow, as defined in 160.203 of this chapter, and other required information as set out in 160.211 and 160.213 of this chapter, if applicable.

161.20 Position Report (PR).

(a) A vessel must report its name and position:
(1) Upon point of entry into a VTS area;
(2) At designated reporting points as set forth in subpart C; or
(3) When directed by the VTC.
NOTE: Notice of temporary reporting points, if established, may be published via Local Notices to Mariners, general broadcast or the VTS User's Manual.

161.21 Sailing Plan Deviation Report (DR).

A vessel must report:
(a) When its ETA to a destination varies significantly from a previously reported ETA;
(b) Any intention to deviate from a VTS issued measure or vessel traffic routing system; or
(c) Any significant deviation from previously reported information.

161.22 Final Report (FR).

A vessel must report its name and position:
(a) On arrival at its destination; or
(b) When leaving a VTS area.

161.23 Reporting Exemptions.

(a) Unless otherwise directed, the following vessels are exempted from providing Position and Final Reports due to the nature of their operation:
(1) Vessels on a published schedule and route;
(2) Vessels operating within an area of a radius of three nautical miles or less; or
(3) Vessels escorting another vessel or assisting another vessel in maneuvering procedures.
(b) A vessel described in paragraph (a) of this section must:
(1) Provide a Sailing Plan at least 5 minutes but not more than 15 minutes before navigating within the VTS area; and
(2) If it departs from its promulgated schedule by more than 15 minutes or changes its limited operating area, make the established VMRS reports, or report as directed.
(c) In those VTS areas capable of receiving automated position reports from Automated Dependent Surveillance Shipborne Equipment (ADSSE) as required by 164.43 of this chapter and where ADSSE is required, vessels equipped with an operating ADSSE are not required to make voice radio position reports at designated reporting points as required by 161.20(a)(2) of this part, unless otherwise directed by the VTC.
(1) Whenever an ADSSE becomes nonoperational as defined in 164.43(c) of this chapter, before entering or while underway in a VTS area, a vessel must:
(i) Notify the VTC;
(ii) Make voice radio position reports at designated reporting points as required by 161.20(a)(2) of this part;
(iii) Make other voice radio reports as directed; and
(iv) Restore the ADSSE to operating condition as soon as possible.
(2) Whenever an ADSSE becomes nonoperational due to a loss of position correction information (i.e. the U.S. Coast Guard differential global positioning system (DGPS) cannot provide the required error correction messages) a vessel must:
(i) Make required voice radio position reports at designated reporting points required by 161.20(a)(2) of this part; and
(ii) Make other voice radio reports as directed.
NOTE: Regulations pertaining to ADSSE required capabilities are set forth in 164.43 of this chapter.

161.50 Vessel Traffic Service San Francisco.

(a) The VTS area consists of all the navigable waters of San Francisco Bay Region south of the Mare Island Causeway Bridge and the Petaluma River Entrance Channel DayBeacon "19" and Petaluma River Entrance Light "20" and north of the Dunbarton Bridge; its seaward approaches within a 38 nautical mile radius of Mount Tamalpais (37deg 55.8min N., 122deg 34.6min W.); and its navigable tributaries as far east as the port of Stockton on the San Joaquin River, as far north as the port of Sacramento on the Sacramento River.

PART 164 - NAVIGATION SAFETY REGULATIONS

164.03 Incorporation by Reference.

(a)* * *
(b) The materials approved for incorporation by reference in this part and the sections affected are: Radio Technical Commission For Maritime Services (RTCM), 655 Fifteenth St., N.W., Suite 300, Washington, D.C. 20005 Minimum Performance Standards (MPS) Marine Loran C Receiving Equipment, RTCM Paper 12-78/DO-100, 1977 164.41.
RTCM Recommended Standards for Differential NAVSTAR GPS Service, Version 2.0, RTCM Paper 134-89/SC 104-68, 1990-164.43.
* * * * *

164.43 Automated Dependent Surveillance Shipborne Equipment.

(a) Each vessel required to provide automated position reports to a Vessel Traffic Service (VTS) must do so by an installed Automated Dependent Surveillance Shipborne Equipment (ADSSE) system consisting of a:
(1) Twelve-channel all-in-view Differential Global Positioning System (DGPS) receiver;
(2) Marine band Non-Directional Beacon receiver capable of receiving DGPS error correction messages;
(3) VHF-FM transceiver capable of Digital Selective Calling (DSC) on the designated DSC frequency; and
(4) Control unit.
(b) An ADSSE must have the following capabilities:
(1) Use DGPS to sense the position of the vessel and determine the time of the position using Universal Coordinated Time (UTC);
(2) Fully use the broadcast type 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 9, and 16 messages, as specified in RTCM Recommended Standards for Differential NAVSTAR GPS Service in determining the required information;
(3) Achieve a position error which is less than ten meters (32.8 feet) 2 distance root mean square (2 drms) from the true North American Datum of 1983 (NAD 83) in the position information transmitted to a VTS;
(4) Achieve a course error of less than 0.5 degrees from true course over ground in the course information transmitted to a VTS;
(5) Achieve a speed error of less than 0.05 knots from true speed over ground in the speed information transmitted to a VTS;
(6) Receive and comply with commands broadcast from a VTS as DSC messages on the designated DSC frequency;
(7) Receive and comply with RTCM messages broadcast as minimum shift keying modulated medium frequency signals in the marine radio beacon band, and supply the messages to the DGPS receiver;
(8) Transmit the vessel's position, tagged with the UTC at position solution, course over ground, speed over ground, and Lloyd's identification number to a VTS;
(9) Display a visual alarm to indicate to shipboard personnel when a failure to receive or utilize the RTCM messages occurs;
(10) Display a separate visual alarm which is triggered by a VTS utilizing a DSC message to indicate to shipboard personnel that the U.S. Coast Guard DGPS system cannot provide the required error correction messages; and
(11) Display two RTCM type 16 messages, one of which must display the position error in the position error broadcast.
(c) An ADSSE is considered non-operational if it fails to meet the requirements of paragraph (b) of this section.
NOTE: Vessel Traffic Service (VTS) areas and operating procedures are set forth in Part 161 of this chapter.

Regulated Navigation Area
San Francisco Bay Region, CA
DEPARTMENT OF
TRANSPORTATION
Coast Guard 33 CFR Parts 162 and 165

Background and Purpose.

In 1972, the Coast Guard, with input from various members of the San Francisco Bay maritime community, established voluntary vessel traffic routing measures for the San Francisco Bay region that consisted of traffic lanes in the Golden Gate and the Central Bay extending to Pinole Shoal Channel; separation zones; a precautionary area east of Alcatraz Island; and an Oakland Harbor Limited Traffic Area. Compliance with these routing measures was voluntary and intended for use by vessels 300 gross tons or greater.

In 1991, the precautionary area east of Alcatraz Island was expanded to include the water area between the San Francisco waterfront and Treasure Island, replacing the traffic lanes in that area. A deep water route was established north of Harding Rock.

In 1993, the Coast Guard, with input from the Harbor Safety Committee of the San Francisco Bay Region, modified the voluntary traffic routing measures to better conform to International Maritime Organization (IMO) traffic routing standards. The 1993 modification added a Golden Gate precautionary area, a deep water traffic lane separation zone north of Harding Rock and an expanded Central Bay precautionary area. It eliminated the traffic lanes in the North Ship Channel and San Pablo Strait.

The presence of numerous recreational boats, windsurfers, and commercial fishing boats that transit the proposed RNAs poses a navigational hazard for vessels of 1600 or more gross tons which are constrained by their draft and maneuvering capabilities. By limiting or requiring the use of established traffic lanes, this rule will relieve congestion and promote safer transiting of the RNAs by vessels with restricted maneuverability. The rule makes the present voluntary traffic measures mandatory and requires vessels 1600 gross tons or more, or tugs with a tow of 1600 gross tons or more, to follow traffic measures similar to those currently used on a voluntary basis. The regulation also defines precautionary areas and establishes overtaking, meeting, crossing and speed restrictions for certain vessels transiting specific channels within the RNAs.

The RNAs, which lie within the San Francisco VTS area (33 CFR 161.50), are as follows: San Francisco Bay RNA, North Ship Channel RNA, San Pablo Strait Channel RNA, Pinole Shoal Channel RNA, Southern Pacific Railroad Bridge RNA, Southampton Shoal / Richmond Harbor RNA, and Oakland Harbor RNA.

General requirements for all RNAs.

The depth of the water and geography of the San Francisco Bay Region, and the density of vessel traffic, which includes numerous ferries and recreational boats, severely constrain the ability of a vessel to maneuver in the event of an emergency. This regulation limits the maximum speed within the RNAs to 15 knots through the water for vessels 1600 gross tons or greater, or a tug with a tow of 1600 gross tons or greater, and requires those vessels to operate their engine(s) in a control mode and on fuel that will allow for an immediate response to any engine order, ahead or astern, including stopping its engine(s) for an extended period of time. Limiting vessel speeds to 15 knots or less through the water within the prescribed RNAs will reduce the risk of serious maritime accidents.

There may be situations where vessels would be unable to safely comply with the requirements of this regulation. In such cases, the Captain of the Port, or the Commanding Officer, VTS San Francisco, acting as a representative of the Captain of the Port, may allow a vessel to deviate from this regulation.

The RNAs defined in this rule are each considered to constitute a narrow channel or fairway. Therefore, Rule 9 of the Inland Navigation Rules (INRs) (33 U.S.C. 2009), in conjunction with the provisions of the associated INRs, is specifically made applicable within the defined RNAs and will be enforced.

Specific requirements for individual proposed RNAs.

The geographic descriptions and proposed requirements specific to each RNA are as follows:

San Francisco Bay RNA.

The San Francisco Bay RNA consists of the water area in the Golden Gate east of the COLREGS Demarcation Line (33 CFR 80.1142), the Central Bay including Raccoon Strait, and the existing charted precautionary area east of Alcatraz Island.

Because of the large number of vessels entering and departing San Francisco Bay, traffic lanes are established in the Golden Gate and the Central Bay to separate opposing traffic and reduce vessel congestion. The lanes are located where voluntary traffic lanes previously existed. Use of these lanes and adherence to the indicated direction of travel is required for vessels of 1600 or more gross tons, or tugs with a tow of 1600 or more gross tons, and recommended for all other vessels.

Due to the presence of shoals and rocks in the Central Bay, the Central Bay Two-way Deep Water Traffic Lane (DWTL), located north of Harding Rock, provides the best water depth safety margin for inbound vessels with a draft of 45 feet or greater, and for outbound vessels with a draft of 28 feet or greater. These deep draft vessels are required to use the DWTL. It is recommended that all other vessels use the Central Bay Traffic Lanes so that vessel traffic in the DWTL is kept to a minimum.

The DWTL is sufficiently narrow that meeting, crossing, and overtaking restrictions are necessary to reduce the likelihood of collision. The regulation provides that a power-driven vessel of 1600 or more gross tons, or a tug with a tow of 1600 or more gross tons, shall not enter the DWTL when another power-driven vessel of 1600 or more gross tons, or tug with a tow of 1600 or more gross tons, is navigating therein when either vessel is carrying certain dangerous cargo (as defined in 33 CFR 160.203), or bulk petroleum products, or is a tank vessel in ballast, if such entry could result in meeting, crossing, or overtaking the other vessel.

Since vessels are converging or crossing in such a manner that one-way traffic flow patterns, although desired, cannot be established, two precautionary areas are established in this RNA. They are: (1) the Golden Gate Precautionary Area, which encompasses the waters around the Golden Gate Bridge between the Golden Gate and the Central Traffic Lanes; and (2) the Central Bay Precautionary Area, which encompasses the large portion of the Central Bay and part of the Lower Bay. It is recommended that all vessels navigating in these precautionary areas be aware of the joining traffic lanes and DWTL so as to anticipate the movements of other vessels.

North Ship Channel RNA and San Pablo Strait Channel RNA.

The North Ship Channel and San Pablo Strait Channel RNAs consist of the existing charted channels and delineate the only areas where the depths of water are sufficient to allow the safe transit of vessels of 1600 or more gross tons, or a tug with a tow of 1600 or more gross tons. The existence of strong tidal currents in these channels severely restrict the ability of vessels of 1600 or more gross tons, or a tug with a tow of 1600 or more gross tons, to safely maneuver to avoid smaller vessels. These conditions create the need to apply the general regulations to these areas.

Implementation of special regulations in these RNAs would have only a minimal impact on safety and is not justified at this time.

Pinole Shoal Channel RNA.

The Pinole Shoal Channel RNA is a constricted waterway the use of which is currently restricted to vessels with a draft greater than 20 feet, or towboats with tows drawing more than 20 feet. Because of the narrow width of the channel and the draft of vessels using the channel, further meeting, crossing, and overtaking restrictions are necessary to reduce the likelihood of collision. This regulation provides that a power-driven vessel of 1600 or more gross tons, or a tug with a tow of 1600 or more gross tons, shall not enter the Pinole Shoal Channel RNA, which extends from approximately Light 7 to Light 13 of the Pinole Shoal Channel, when another power-driven vessel of 1600 or more gross tons, or tug with a tow of 1600 or more gross tons, is navigating therein and when either vessel is carrying certain dangerous cargo (as defined in 33 CFR 160.203) or bulk petroleum products, or is a tank vessel in ballast, if such entry would result in meeting, crossing, or overtaking the other vessel.

Southern Pacific Railroad Bridge RNA.

The Southern Pacific Railroad Bridge RNA consists of a small circular area, 200 yards in radius, centered on the middle of the channel under the Southern Pacific Railroad Bridge. The limited horizontal clearance results in a greater chance of vessel allisions with the bridge. This risk of allision is significantly increased when poor visibility conditions exist. The regulation precludes a power-driven vessel of 1600 or more gross tons, or a tug with a tow of 1600 or more gross tons, from transiting the Southern Pacific Railroad Bridge RNA when visibility is less than 1000 yards.

Southampton Shoal/Richmond Harbor RNA.

The Southampton Shoal / Richmond Harbor RNA encompasses Southampton Shoal Channel, the Richmond Long Wharf Maneuvering Area, the Richmond Harbor Entrance Channel and Point Potrero Reach. These are dredged channels and areas within which maneuvering room is severely limited. Close-quarters situations between deep-draft vessels in these channels need to be eliminated to reduce the risk of groundings and collisions.

In addition, the Southampton Shoal Channel is transited by a high number of laden tank vessels and vessels carrying certain dangerous cargo (as defined in 33 CFR 160.203), or bulk petroleum. Because of the potential for loss of life or serious environmental consequences in a collision involving one or more of these vessels, control of traffic flow is necessary. The Richmond Long Wharf Maneuvering Area, between the Richmond Harbor Entrance Channel and Southampton Shoal Channel, often has vessels operating at low speeds where maneuverability is restricted. The regulation precludes vessels of 1600 or more gross tons, or tugs with a tow of 1600 or more gross tons, from entering the RNA if meeting, crossing, or overtaking another vessel of 1600 or more gross tons, or a tug with a tow of 1600 or more gross tons, could result.

Oakland Harbor RNA.

The Oakland Harbor RNA encompasses the Oakland Bar Channel, Oakland Outer Harbor Entrance, Middle Harbor and Inner Harbor Entrance Channels. The charted Limited Traffic Area (LTA), which recommends that vessels of 300 or more gross tons transit one at a time to avoid crossing or meeting situations, is replaced by the Oakland Harbor RNA. The northern boundary of the Oakland Harbor RNA differs slightly from the LTA in that it follows the northern boundary of the Oakland Bar and Outer Harbor Entrance channels and extends to the "E" tower of the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge. This regulation restricts vessels of 1600 or more gross tons or tugs with a tow of 1600 or more gross tons: from entering the RNA if meeting, crossing, or overtaking another vessel of 1600 or more gross tons, or a tug with a tow of 1600 or more gross tons, could result.

Regulations: In consideration of the foregoing, the Coast Guard is amending Parts 162 and 165 of Title 33, Code of Federal Regulations, as follows:

PART 162 - INLAND WATERWAYS NAVIGATION REGULATIONS

PART 165 - REGULATED NAVIGATION AREAS AND LIMITED ACCESS AREAS

165.1114 San Francisco Bay Region, California - Regulated Navigation Area.

(a) Applicability.

This section applies to all vessels unless otherwise specified.

(b) Deviations.

The Captain of the Port, San Francisco Bay, or the Commanding Officer, Vessel Traffic Service San Francisco, as a representative of the Captain of the Port, may authorize a deviation from the requirements of this regulation when it is deemed necessary in the interests of safety.

(c) Regulated Navigation Areas.
(1) San Francisco Bay RNA.

(i) The following is a regulated navigation area -- the waters bounded by a line connecting the following points, beginning at:

Latitude                Longitude
37deg 47min 18sec N     122deg 30min 22sec W; thence to
37deg 48min 55sec N     122deg 31min 41sec W; thence to
37deg 50min 38sec N     122deg 28min 37sec W; thence to
37deg 50min 59sec N     122deg 28min 00sec W; thence to
37deg 51min 45sec N     122deg 27min 28sec W; thence to
37deg 52min 58sec N     122deg 26min 06sec W; thence to
37deg 51min 53sec N     122deg 24min 58sec W; thence to
37deg 51min 53sec N     122deg 24min 00sec W; thence to
37deg 51min 40sec N     122deg 23min 48sec W; thence to
37deg 49min 22sec N     122deg 23min 48sec W; thence to
37deg 48min 20sec N     122deg 22min 12sec W; thence to
37deg 47min 02sec N     122deg 21min 33sec W; thence to
37deg 47min 02sec N     122deg 23min 04sec W; thence 
along the shoreline to the point of beginning.
DATUM: NAD 83
(ii)The San Francisco Bay RNA consists of the following defined sub-areas:
(A) Golden Gate Traffic Lanes.
(1) Westbound Traffic Lane:

Bounded by the Golden Gate precautionary area and the COLREGS Demarcation Line (33 CFR 80.1142), between the separation zone and a line connecting the following points:

Latitude                Longitude
37deg 48min 30sec N     122deg 31min 22sec W; thence to 
37deg 49min 03sec N     122deg 29min 52sec W.
DATUM: NAD 83
(2) Eastbound Traffic Lane.

Bounded by the COLREGS Demarcation Line (33 CFR 80.1142) and the Golden Gate precautionary area, between the separation zone and a line connecting the following points:

Latitude                Longitude
37deg 47min 50sec N     122deg 30min 48sec W; thence to
37deg 48min 30sec N     122deg 29min 29sec W.
DATUM: NAD 83
(3) Golden Gate Separation Zone:

The area 75 yards each side of a line connecting the following points:

Latitude                Longitude
37deg 48min 08sec N     122deg 31min 05sec W; thence to
37deg 48min 46sec N     122deg 29min 40sec W.
DATUM: NAD 83
(B) Golden Gate Precautionary Area:

An area bounded by a line connecting the following points, beginning at:

Latitude                Longitude
37deg 48min 30sec N     122deg 29min 29sec W; thence to
37deg 48min 52sec N     122deg 28min 41sec W; thence to
37deg 48min 52sec N     122deg 27min 49sec W; thence to
37deg 49min 36sec N     122deg 27min 46sec W; thence to
37deg 49min 55sec N     122deg 28min 09sec W; thence to
37deg 49min 28sec N     122deg 28min 45sec W; thence to
37deg 49min 03sec N     122deg 29min 52sec W; thence 
returning to the point of beginning.
DATUM: NAD 83
(c) Central Bay Traffic Lanes.
(1) Westbound Traffic Lane:

Bounded by the Central Bay precautionary area and the Golden Gate precautionary area, between the Central Bay and the Deep Water Traffic Lane separation zones.

(2) Eastbound Traffic Lane:

Bounded by the Golden Gate precautionary area and the Central Bay precautionary area, between the Central Bay Separation Zone and a line connecting the following points, beginning at:

Latitude                Longitude
37deg 48min 41sec N     122deg 25min 17sec W; thence to
37deg 48min 50sec N     122deg 26min 14sec W; thence to
37sec 48min 52sec N     122deg 27min 49sec W.
DATUM: NAD 83
(3) Deep Water (two-way) Traffic Lane:

Bounded by the Central Bay precautionary area and the Golden Gate precautionary area, between the Deep Water Traffic Lane and a line connecting the following points, beginning at:

Latitude                Longitude
37deg 49min 55sec N     122deg 28min 09sec W; thence to
37deg 50min 36sec N     122deg 27min 12sec W; thence to
37deg 50min 47sec N     122deg 26min 26sec W.
DATUM: NAD 83
(D) Central Bay Separation Zone:

The area 75 yards each side of a line connecting the following points, beginning at:

Latitude                Longitude
37deg 49min 17sec N     122deg 27min 47sec W; thence to
37deg 49min 35sec N     122deg 25min 25sec W.
DATUM: NAD 83
(E) Deep Water Traffic Lane Separation Zone:

The area 75 yards each side of a line connecting the following points, beginning at:

Latitude                Longitude
37deg 49min 36sec N     122deg 27min 46sec W; thence to
37deg 50min 22sec N     122deg 26min 49sec W; thence to
37deg 50min 25sec N     122deg 26min 22sec W.
DATUM: NAD 83
(F) Central Bay Precautionary Area:

An area bounded by a line connecting the following points, beginning at:

Latitude                Longitude
37deg 48min 41sec N     122deg 25min 17sec W; thence to
37deg 49min 32sec N     122deg 25min 13sec W; thence to
37deg 50min 25sec N     122deg 26min 22sec W; thence to
37deg 50min 47sec N     122deg 26min 26sec W; thence to
37deg 51min 04sec N     122deg 24min 58sec W; thence to
37deg 51min 53sec N     122deg 24min 58sec W; thence to
37deg 51min 53sec N     122deg 24min 00sec W; thence to
37deg 51min 40sec N     122deg 23min 48sec W; thence to
37deg 49min 22sec N     122deg 23min 48sec W; thence to
37deg 48min 20sec N     122deg 22min 12sec W; thence to
37deg 47min 02sec N     122deg 21min 33sec W; thence to
37deg 47min 02sec N     122deg 23min 04sec W; thence 
returning along the shoreline to the point of beginning.
DATUM: NAD 83
(2) North Ship Channel RNA.

The following is a regulated navigation area --the waters bounded by a line connecting the following points, beginning at:

Latitude                Longitude
37deg 51min 53sec N     122deg 24min 58sec W; thence to
37deg 54min 15sec N     122deg 27min 27sec W; thence to
37deg 56min 06sec N     122deg 26min 49sec W; thence to
37deg 56min 06sec N     122deg 26min 34sec W; thence to
37deg 54min 48sec N     122deg 26min 42sec W; thence to
37deg 54min 02sec N     122deg 26min 10sec W; thence to
37deg 51min 53sec N     122deg 24min 00sec W; thence 
returning to the point of beginning.
DATUM: NAD 83
(3) San Pablo Strait Channel RNA.

The following is a regulated navigation area --the waters bounded by a line connecting the following points, beginning at:

Latitude                Longitude
37deg 56min 06sec N     122deg 26min 49sec W; thence to
37deg 57min 26sec N     122deg 27min 21sec W; thence to
38deg 00min 48sec N     122deg 24min 45sec W; thence to
38deg 01min 54sec N     122deg 22min 24sec W; thence to
38deg 01min 44sec N     122deg 22min 18sec W; thence to
37deg 57min 37sec N     122deg 26min 23sec W; thence to
37deg 56min 06sec N     122deg 26min 34sec W; thence 
returning to the point of beginning.
DATUM: NAD 83
(4) Pinole Shoal Channel RNA. 

The following is a regulated navigation area --the waters bounded by a line connecting the following points, beginning at:

Latitude                Longitude
38deg 01min 54sec N     122deg 22min 25sec W; thence to
38deg 03min 13sec N     122deg 19min 50sec W; thence to
38deg 03min 23sec N     122deg 18min 31sec W; thence to
38deg 03min 13sec N     122deg 18min 29sec W; thence to
38deg 03min 05sec N     122deg 19min 28sec W; thence to
38deg 01min 44sec N     122deg 22min 18sec W; thence 
returning to the point of beginning.
DATUM: NAD 83
(5) Southern Pacific Railroad Bridge RNA.

The following is a regulated navigation area -- the water area contained within a circle with a radius of 200 yards, centered on 38deg 02min 18sec N, 122deg 07min 17sec W.
DATUM: NAD 83

(6) Southampton Shoal Channel/Richmond Harbor RNA:

The following, consisting of two distinct areas, is a regulated navigation area --
(i) The waters bounded by a line connecting the following points, beginning at:

Latitude                Longitude
37deg 54min 17sec N     122deg 22min 00sec W; thence to
37deg 54min 08sec N     122deg 22min 00sec W; thence to
37deg 54min 15sec N     122deg 23min 12sec W; thence to
37deg 54min 30sec N     122deg 23min 09sec W; thence 
along the shoreline to the point of beginning.
DATUM: NAD 83

(ii)The waters bounded by a line connecting the following points, beginning at:

Latitude                Longitude
37deg 54min 28sec N     122deg 23min 36sec W; thence to
37deg 54min 20sec N     122deg 23min 38sec W; thence to
37deg 54min 23sec N     122deg 24min 02sec W; thence to
37deg 54min 57sec N     122deg 24min 51sec W; thence to
37deg 55min 05sec N     122deg 25min 02sec W; thence to
37deg 54min 57sec N     122deg 25min 22sec W; thence to
37deg 54min 00sec N     122deg 25min 13sec W; thence to
37deg 53min 59sec N     122deg 25min 22sec W; thence to
37deg 55min 30sec N     122deg 25min 35sec W; thence to
37deg 55min 40sec N     122deg 25min 10sec W; thence to
37deg 54min 54sec N     122deg 24min 30sec W; thence to
37deg 54min 30sec N     122deg 24min 00sec W; thence 
returning to the point of beginning.
DATUM: NAD 83
(7) Oakland Harbor RNA.

The following is a regulated navigation area -- the waters bounded by a line connecting the following points, beginning at:

Latitude                Longitude
37deg 48min 40sec N     122deg 19min 58sec W; thence to
37deg 48min 50sec N     122deg 20min 02sec W; thence to
37deg 48min 20sec N     122deg 21min 00sec W; thence to
37deg 48min 15sec N     122deg 21min 30sec W; thence to
37deg 48min 20sec N     122deg 22min 12sec W; thence to
37deg 47min 26sec N     122deg 21min 45sec W; thence to
37deg 47min 55sec N     122deg 21min 26sec W; thence to
37deg 48min 03sec N     122deg 21min 00sec W; thence to
37deg 47min 48sec N     122deg 19min 46sec W; thence to
37deg 47min 55sec N     122deg 19min 43sec W; thence 
returning along the shoreline to the point of the beginning.
DATUM: NAD 83

(d) General Regulations.

(1) A power-driven vessel of 1600 or more gross tons, or a tug with a tow of 1600 or more gross tons, navigating within the RNAs defined in subparagraph (c) of this section, shall not exceed a speed of 15 knots through the water.
(2) A power-driven vessel of 1600 or more gross tons, or a tug with a tow of 1600 or more gross tons, navigating within the RNAs defined in subparagraph (c) of this section, shall have its engine(s) ready for immediate maneuver and shall operate its engine(s) in a control mode and on fuel that will allow for an immediate response to any engine order, ahead or astern, including stopping its engine(s) for an extended period of time.
(3) The master, pilot or person directing the movement of a vessel within the RNAs defined in subparagraph (c) of this regulation shall comply with Rule 9 of the Inland Navigation Rules (INRs) (33 U.S.C. 2009) in conjunction with the provisions of the associated INRS.

(e) Specific Regulations.

(1) San Francisco Bay RNA:

(i) A vessel shall navigate with particular caution in a precautionary area, or in areas near the terminations of traffic lanes or channels, as described in this regulation.
(ii) A power-driven vessel of 1600 or more gross tons, or a tug with a tow of 1600 or more gross tons, shall:
(A) use the appropriate traffic lane and proceed in the general direction of traffic flow for that lane;
(B) use the Central Bay Deep Water Traffic Lane if eastbound with a draft of 45 feet or greater or westbound with a draft of 28 feet or greater;
(C) not enter the Central Bay Deep Water Traffic Lane when another power-driven vessel of 1600 or more gross tons or tug with a tow of 1600 or more gross tons is navigating therein when either vessel is:
(1) carrying certain dangerous cargoes (as denoted in section 160.203 of this subchapter);
(2) carrying bulk petroleum products; or
(3) a tank vessel in ballast if such entry would result in meeting, crossing, or overtaking the other vessel;
(D) normally join or leave a traffic lane at the termination of the lane, but when joining or leaving from either side, shall do so at as small an angle to the general direction of traffic flow as practicable;
(E) so far as practicable keep clear of the Central Bay Separation Zone and the Deep Water Traffic Lane Separation Zone;
(F) not cross a traffic lane separation zone unless crossing, joining, or leaving a traffic lane.

(2) Pinole Shoal Channel RNA:

(i) The use of Pinole Shoal Channel RNA is reserved for navigation of vessels with a draft greater than 20 feet or tugs with tows drawing more than 20 feet. Vessels drawing less than 20 feet are not permitted within this RNA and are prohibited from crossing it at any point.
(ii) A power-driven vessel of 1600 or more gross tons or a tug with a tow of 1600 or more gross tons shall not enter Pinole Shoal Channel RNA when another power-driven vessel of 1600 or more gross tons or tug with a tow of 1600 or more gross tons is navigating therein when either vessel is:
(A) carrying certain dangerous cargoes (as denoted in section 160.203 of this subchapter);
(B) carrying bulk petroleum products; or
(C) a tank vessel in ballast if such entry would result in meeting, crossing, or overtaking the other vessel.
(iii) Vessels permitted to use this channel shall proceed at a reasonable speed so as not to endanger other vessels or interfere with any work which may become necessary in maintaining, surveying, or buoying the channel, and they shall not anchor in the channel except in case of a deviation authorized under paragraph (b) of this section.
(iv) This paragraph shall not be construed as prohibiting any necessary use of the channel by any public vessels while engaged in official duties, or in emergencies by pilot boats.

(3) Southern Pacific Railroad Bridge RNA:

(i) When visibility is less than 1000 yards within the Southern Pacific Railroad Bridge RNA, a power-driven vessel of 1600 or more gross tons, or a tug with a tow of 1600 or more gross tons:
(A) When eastbound, shall not transit through the RNA.
(B) When westbound:
(1) During periods of reduced visibility and immediately prior to passing New York Point, the master, pilot, or person directing the movement of a vessel shall obtain a report of visibility conditions within the RNA.
(2) If visibility within the RNA is less than 1000 yards, the vessel shall not transit the RNA. Vessels prevented from transiting due to low visibility shall not proceed past Mallard Island until visibility improves to greater than 1000 yards within the RNA.
(3) If a transit between New York Point and the Southern Pacific Railroad Bridge has commenced, and the visibility subsequently should become less than 1000 yards, the master, pilot, or person directing the movement of a vessel shall comply with subparagraph (b) of this section and may proceed, taking all further appropriate actions in the interest of safety.
(ii) Visibility is considered to be 1000 yards or greater when both the following geographical points can be seen from the Southern Pacific Railroad Bridge:
(A) The Port of Benicia Pier, and
(B) The Shell Martinez Pier.

(4) Southampton Shoal/Richmond Harbor RNA:

A power-driven vessel of 1600 or more gross tons, or a tug with a tow of 1600 or more gross tons, shall not enter Southampton Shoal/ Richmond Harbor RNA when another power-driven vessel of 1600 or more gross tons, or a tug with a tow of 1600 or more gross tons, is navigating therein, if such entry would result in meeting, crossing, or overtaking the other vessel.

(5) Oakland Harbor RNA:

A power-driven vessel of 1600 or more gross tons or a tug with a tow of 1600 or more gross tons shall not enter the Oakland Harbor RNA when another power-driven vessel of 1600 or more gross tons, or a tug with a tow of 1600 or more gross tons, is navigating therein, if such entry would result in meeting, crossing, or overtaking the other vessel.

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